Why Fibreglass?

Why Fibreglass?

Perhaps the prime reason for using fiber-glass-reinforced plastics (FRP) is because of their inherent corrosion resistance. In many cases, they are the only materials that will handle a given service environment; and in other cases, their corrosion resistance is combined with their economy to make them the most economical acceptable solution. Corrosion resistance of FRP is a function of both the resin content and the specific resin used in the laminate. Generally speaking, the higher the resin content, the more corrosion resistant the laminate.6407272787_c5b54fd55b_o

Another very distinct advantage of FRP is its low weight-to-strength ratio. As a rule of thumb, for the same strength, FRP will weigh approximately one seventh as much as steel, and half as much as aluminium. Lightweight properties are important when considering the cost and ease of installation, especially for pipe and tanks. FRP’s inherent lightweight is an advantage when equipment must be mounted on existing structures, such as scrubbers on mezzanines or rooftops, and for speciality applications such as FRP tank trailers.

While not as important for corrosion-resistant equipment, high strength fibreglass mould suppliers does play a major role in the design of FRP equipment for such applications as missiles, pultruded shapes, etc. For filament wound pipe and duct, the high strength gives the lightweight features discussed earlier.

Often, a major advantage of FRP is its lower cost. When comparing materials for corrosion service, rubber lining, titanium, Monel, Hastelloy, Carpenter 20, and the exotic stainless materials are very frequently alternatives to FRP. In these cases, FRP may offer both a satisfactory solution to corrosion problems and the lowest cost. There is no rule of thumb for comparing costs of FRP with other materials. These costs depend upon the application, the design considerations, the pressures (or vacuums) involved, the product configurations, and raw material cost and availability.

Too many people overlook the versatility of FRP. It is best for many applications because you can do things with it that cannot be done economically with other materials. You can mold almost any configuration, or piece of equipment, for which you can build a temporary or permanent mold. For ductwork, for example, you can make all types of elbows, rectangular to circular transitions, Tee inlets, and flanges all in a wide proliferation of round and rectangular sizes and shapes at minimal tooling cost. It is also possible to use FRP to line existing structures

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The Ideal Wine Cellar

The Ideal Wine Cellar

It follows from all of the above that the ideal place for wine storage is a nice, dark, roomy, slightly dank cellar with a single discreet entrance to which only you have the key. It is lined with wine racks but has masses of room to walk around and to stack wine in its original cases, as well as little tasting corner and a large desk for keeping cellar records up to date. You can get custom wine cellars done for you by cellarmaison.com.33737996255_4d05e7e7f2_k

For most of us, alas, this cellar belongs in the realm of fantasy. Most modern dwellings have a shortage of storage space of any kind, let alone somewhere cool, dark, quiet, slightly damp and roomy enough for a cache of bottles. Garden sheds and all but the most protected outbuildings are unsuitable in the British climate because of the danger of the temperature’s dropping below -4 °C (25 °F). The main problem with most possible indoor places, on the other hand, is that they are too warm. Central heating boilers tend to be put wherever there is spare storage space, which rules out storing wine there – unless the boiler can be insulated. Insulation of this sort is generally the key to establishing some decent permanent territory for a large wine collection, whether of a basement, an attic, or a slice of a room which becomes a walk-in wine cellar. Many people will be unwilling to make this much commitment however and are really looking for somewhere to store a dozen or two bottles. They could be kept in an attic, basement or corner of a spare-room under an insulation blanket, or even in an old fireplace or possibly under the stairs. It is useful if possible to keep a bowlful of water on the ground near the wine to keep the humidity level up.

Bottles can be stored in wooden wine cases, or those made from the strongest cardboard, so long as the corks are kept damp. A proper wine rack will last longer and can be made to any shape you specify. Double depth models can be useful and you can design your own cellar with cellarmaison.com. The worst place to store wine (a fact unbeknown to many kitchen designers) is by a cooker or on top of a fridge where there are frequent blasts of hot air.

If you are serious about wine you can buy an ‘artificial cellar’, a temperature- and humidity-controlled cabinet like a refrigerator which keeps reds and whites at pre-ordained temperatures in different parts of it. It is also possible to buy a spiral cellar which can be sunk into a specially excavated hole under ground level, but the installation can be messy. Key ‘spiral cellar’ into the general search box for extensive coverage of these facilities of which I, for one, have one.

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Thinking Outside The Box For Office Space

Thinking Outside The Box For Office Space

24Sooner or later, a business owner will have to decide whether they’re going to buy their own office space. This is often misinterpreted as the ‘next step forward’ – a logical advancement for any company which can afford to make it.

However, the truth is that plenty of thriving businesses continue to rent their office space with Occupa, choosing never to buy at all. Here are just a few reasons why you should think about following their lead.

The one great, looming, nail-biting problem associated with buying your own office space is the large investment of capital which is involved in doing so. Capital is normally better invested in the business itself rather than in the building in which it operates, and commercial mortgages will typically require you to stump up around 25% of the asking price, while still exposing you to possible increased interest rates in the future.

If that just doesn’t account for enough of your money, then you’ll be thrilled to remember that legal bills will also need to be paid. Of course, who doesn’t enjoy giving money to lawyers? In contrast, renting an office involves very little in the way of upfront costs. The most you’ll normally be required to pay is a security deposit, but that expense won’t come close to the amount you’d need when buying. Also, that’s a deposit, not a payment, so you’re apt to get most of it back when you leave the building. There’s also the possibility of offsetting that cost through the rent-free periods which many office leases include at the start of longer contracts. The only thing better than low upfront cost is no upfront cost.

Of course, cost is one thing, but effort is quite another. Even a business owner with money to burn is going to need to take time away from their schedule in order to oversee the fitting out of a newly purchased office space. Phone lines and computer points need to be installed, internet connections need to be sorted, furniture needs to be ordered, delivered, and arranged – even decorations need to be carried out.

Or, you could opt for a serviced lease which sets you up with a fully furnished office which can be moved into without delay. Commercial office spaces with Occupa can come with a wide array of standard and optional features to ensure that they perfectly fit around your requirements. Need somewhere which is ready to go at the drop of a hat? Try renting. Even if you’re set upon infusing the space with your corporate identity, everything can be taken care of without it falling upon your own shoulders.

The reason you’ll be able to customise your space so easily is down to the flexibility offered by leases. These don’t come in just one set arrangement – you’ll be able to tailor the terms to meet your needs, whether that covers just basic equipment or an entire telecommunications infrastructure.

But that’s really just the tip of the iceberg when it comes to flexibility. Beyond the level of service which is provided, you’ll be able to choose between different contract types and select the exact amount of square footage which you’re after.

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Moving Out Of The Home Office

Moving Out Of The Home Office

Home sweet home–as a home based business owner, that perennial country sampler phrase encompasses your world. From sharing lunch with your kids in the kitchen and your hallway commute to your linen closet-cum-storage room, your home is your life. So why would you ever give up your home office for to let offices in Mayfair? have taken the leap from a home office to an out-of-the-home office for several reasons:2

  • As one client’s family grew, his inability to work uninterrupted (as well as his growing responsibility to serve as the backup babysitter on a regular basis) affected his bottom line and his relationship with his family. What initially was an ideal working situation for his freelance writing business became his worst nightmare. He missed deadlines, alienated clients and reached his wit’s end on a daily basis. His choices were to continue a less-than-ideal work situation or relocate his office. The choice was obvious.
  • Some people work better alone, while others need to be surrounded by people to stay motivated. These people thrive on the communal office energy that can’t be recreated at home. These “people persons” are more productive in an outside office than they’ll ever be at home. Instead of trying to overcompensate for being home alone by playing loud music, visiting neighbors or running an excessive amount of errands, move out.
  • One client, a sales rep who always considered himself productive, finally realized that his personality was better suited for an outside office. He took the time to dress for work each day and diligently made it to his desk by 9 a.m. each morning. By 11 a.m., however, his energy waned, his mind wandered, and he often rushed to make lunch plans with colleagues or anyone else he could find. After moving to an outside office with other business professionals nearby, his productivity soared along with his income.
  • A successful business is a curse and a blessing rolled into one. A growing business requires more room, equipment and storage space. It may also require employees–and here’s where things really get crowded. It’s important for an office staff to be able to work well together, but asking them to work on top of one another is asking too much. At that point, you’ll need to rent outside space unless you’re willing to renovate your home to create more office space. Zoning laws may also restrict you from running a homebased business with more than one employee.

Pros and Cons
The advantages of moving out of your home office and into Office space based in London boil down to increased professionalism, more space to work and unlimited growth potential. Of course, with any advantage come a few disadvantages, but nothing that can’t be overcome:

  • Your daily commute will be longer (and not on foot), but if your office is located near your home, the lost time and frustration should be minimal.
  • You’ll need to furnish your office professionally. The dining room chair doubling as an office chair will have to go-especially since clients will be visiting your office.
  • Your overhead will increase, but your revenues could grow proportionately as you attract larger or more clients.
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Print Design Terms You’ll Need

Print Design Terms You’ll Need

The world of print design can be a confusing one for those coming from other design disciplines, not least because of all the unfamiliar printing terms from mdrcreative.co.uk and concepts that have evolved gradually over the hundreds of years along with the art and science of printing.

But getting your head around it is vital if you’re to ensure your designs with mdrcreative.co.uk look the same on paper as they do on screen. Here we explain some of the most important printing terms to help get you started on your journey to becoming a print guru…USED (6)

  • A colorimeter is a device used for measuring the intensity and hue of the light emitted from a computer monitor. The instrument sits flat on the screen, and has a light-reading cell in its underbelly. This information is analysed to build a profile that calibrates the monitor.
  • Professional printers include built-in colour calibration, which tests and measures the response of an ink and paper combination and creates an instant profile.
  • Calibration before each run compensates for changes in ambient temperature, pressure and humidity, and variations in stock.
  • DPI stands for dots per inch. A higher DPI is better.
  • DPI values don’t compare across technologies. Inkjets typically print at around 700dpi for basic proofing, 1440dpi for typical output and 2560dpi for very high quality. Higher DPI values are slightly smoother, but take longer to print and use more ink.
  • Dye-based inks stain media directly rather than printing on a substrate, and are often water-soluble. Colours are brighter than for pigment inks (see 07), but they fade faster. Dye-based inks are often used for photo printing, and sometimes for proofing. ‘Dye-sub’ is an alternative printer technology used for fabric printing with co.uk and other specialised applications. Some inkjet models, especially those by Epson, can be used with dye-sub inks. Prints can be made directly onto fabric or transfer paper, and then fixed into the fabric with a heat press.
  • Also known as ‘wide format’, these are big industrial printers. Smaller units print up to A2 on sheets or rolls; the largest models print on rolls up to 64 inches wide. Prices range from around £2,000 to more than £20,000. They typically use the same technology as desktop printers, but are bigger and should be more reliable. Most inkjets use pigment-based inks, with up to 12 distinct colours.
  • Pigment inks are used for archival art printing, and for black-and-white or lightly toned colour photography. Colours tend to be less saturated than dye-based output, but are more resistant to UV light and fading.
  • Raster Image Processor – a software accessory that works as an enhanced printer driver, producing the highest possible quality output for text, bitmap graphics and vector art. An RIP isn’t essential, but it’s a useful add-on for large format work.
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Design Terms You May Need

Design Terms You May Need

13The world of print design can be a confusing one for those coming from other design disciplines, not least because of all the unfamiliar printing terms from mdrcreative.co.uk and concepts that have evolved gradually over the hundreds of years along with the art and science of printing.

But getting your head around it is vital if you’re to ensure your designs with mdrcreative.co.uk look the same on paper as they do on screen. Here we explain some of the most important printing terms to help get you started on your journey to becoming a print guru…

  • A colorimeter is a device used for measuring the intensity and hue of the light emitted from a computer monitor. The instrument sits flat on the screen, and has a light-reading cell in its underbelly. This information is analysed to build a profile that calibrates the monitor.
  • Professional printers include built-in colour calibration, which tests and measures the response of an ink and paper combination and creates an instant profile.
  • Calibration before each run compensates for changes in ambient temperature, pressure and humidity, and variations in stock.
  • DPI stands for dots per inch. A higher DPI is better.
  • DPI values don’t compare across technologies. Inkjets typically print at around 700dpi for basic proofing, 1440dpi for typical output and 2560dpi for very high quality. Higher DPI values are slightly smoother, but take longer to print and use more ink.
  • Dye-based inks stain media directly rather than printing on a substrate, and are often water-soluble. Colours are brighter than for pigment inks (see 07), but they fade faster. Dye-based inks are often used for photo printing, and sometimes for proofing. ‘Dye-sub’ is an alternative printer technology used for fabric printing with co.uk and other specialised applications. Some inkjet models, especially those by Epson, can be used with dye-sub inks. Prints can be made directly onto fabric or transfer paper, and then fixed into the fabric with a heat press.
  • Also known as ‘wide format’, these are big industrial printers. Smaller units print up to A2 on sheets or rolls; the largest models print on rolls up to 64 inches wide. Prices range from around £2,000 to more than £20,000. They typically use the same technology as desktop printers, but are bigger and should be more reliable. Most inkjets use pigment-based inks, with up to 12 distinct colours.
  • Pigment inks are used for archival art printing, and for black-and-white or lightly toned colour photography. Colours tend to be less saturated than dye-based output, but are more resistant to UV light and fading.
  • Raster Image Processor – a software accessory that works as an enhanced printer driver, producing the highest possible quality output for text, bitmap graphics and vector art. An RIP isn’t essential, but it’s a useful add-on for large format work.
Read More
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